Monday May 14: PQ or No PQ - Post on Greitens and MeToo - Richard on Selecting Jurists and more...

To PQ or Not PQ?

As we head into the final week of session, a fair amount of media attention will obviously be on the courthouse in St. Louis where the governor’s trial is happening.

Inside the building these are long and frantic days.  Legislators are trying to get their bills across the finish line. There will be many conference committees to hammer out compromises between conflicting House and Senate versions of legislation.

On the one hand, it’s nuts to not have the governor in the building at this critical time.  On the other hand, he’s not been especially engaged anyway – so maybe it’s no big difference.  Perhaps his staff and department heads will do just fine communicating their preferences about specific language and policy positions.

In the legislation highway, the Senate is where bottlenecks occur.  Every hour of Senate floor time becomes is precious.  When the Senate convenes today at 2PM, you’ll probably see a few senators stand for the first half-hour or so and speak about whatever’s on their mind.  It’s an implicit threat.  It says I can burn precious time without hardly trying.

And then there’s the matter of “PQ” – calling the previous question to stop debate and vote immediately on a bill.

In the Senate the PQ is parliamentary procedure in which the majority asserts its right to pass what it deems necessary.  It has been called a “traumatic” event in the past.  Those whose voices are quieted always respond by throwing sand in the gears of the Senate and slowing the pace down to a snail’s crawl.  The approval of the Journal becomes an hours-long event, for example.

The consensus in the halls is that the Senate will be using the PQ at some point later this week.  Maybe to put the “Freedom to Work” issue on the ballot.  Some think we could see a couple PQs in a row.

I’ve been of the contrary opinion, believing that we wouldn’t see a PQ.  My thinking was that Senate leaders Ron Richard and Mike Kehoe would want to preserve a bipartisan atmosphere ahead of their possible involvement in the impeachment proceedings.  Furthermore, Richard has spoken more and more this session about the institution of the Senate.  I’ve been imagining that he sees leaving the institution in a functioning state would be a more important “legacy” than any particular piece of legislation. Plus, they’ve already passed a heck of a lot of meaningful packages this session.

I am, however, in the minority opinion on this.  The consensus us that we’ll see PQ(s?) this week.

 

Post on Greitens Scandal

Washington Post had an article on how Greitens’ affair fits into the MeToo movement.  See it here.

Pull Quote:  If Missouri’s governor, Eric Greitens, is convicted or impeached in the coming weeks, as many in the state now expect, he will join a growing roster of politicians and celebrities in driving home a powerful new lesson: The shape of the American sex scandal has shifted. Adultery itself may no longer end a career, but if you use coercion or violence against women, you’re as good as done… As his trial gets underway Monday, Greitens also faces an impeachment vote when a special session begins Friday in the Missouri House of Representatives, where the fact that his own party enjoys a large majority may be no saving grace.

“There’s been a shift,” said Missouri state Rep. Jean Evans, a Republican, “and people are more willing to speak publicly to condemn violence against women, even if it’s from your own party.”…

Trump won Missouri with 57 percent of the vote in 2016, and his supporters break into two camps as they consider their governor’s predicament, Republican strategists say: Hardcore Trump devotees often express skepticism about the allegations against Greitens, picking up on the president’s habit of characterizing talk of scandalous behavior as “fake news.” And those who voted for Trump more hesitantly — mostly as a protest against a paralyzed, unresponsive political system — see Greitens’s case as one more example of cultural decline, corruption and moral rot.

“There’s a good 35 percent of the Republican base who believe the allegations against Greitens are a witch hunt or ‘just an affair,’ ” said James Harris, a veteran GOP political consultant in Jefferson City, Mo. “The governor’s defenders have done a very good job of using messaging very similar to the president’s to characterize this as a liberal prosecutor’s witch hunt. But, of course, there’s never been an allegation that the president hit or duct-taped a woman.”…

The political impact of the Greitens scandal weighs heavily on many Missouri Republicans. “This is going to drive suburban women to turn out and vote for [Sen.] Claire McCaskill and other Democrats,” Harris said. “As long as the governor remains in office, it allows the impression that Republicans are okay with this behavior.”

 

MOScout Poll

The Weekly MOScout poll (see it here) showed US Senator Claire McCaskill again with a lead over Attorney General Josh Hawley.  It also showed President Donald Trump maintaining a 50% job approval rating.  And Governor Eric Greitens still underwater on his job approval.

And

Remember this is with the Remington Research weightings which anticipate a +9 Republican environment this November.

eMailbag on Poll

I have never seen a R dip below 33%. I feel like that 33% represents the people that

just flat hate democrats and an R could probably murder someone and they would still

pick the R over the D.

 

Richard on Jurists Selection

Senate Pro Tem Ron Richard, speaking to reporters at last week’s press avail, indicated that he had done some thinking about the Senate’s duty to choose jurists in the impeachment process – if it comes to that.

Richard said that – despite suggestions from some observers – the Senate position is that retired judges are not eligible to serve in this capacity.

He also said that they planned to avoid choosing judges who would be “up for retention,” in other words, folks who would be on the ballot themselves this year.

And, he said that the Senate would aim to have a good “mix” among the seven jurists, in terms of their geographical representation of the state.

 

Help Wanted

GreenLight Fund seeks Executive Director.  “Founded in Boston in 2003, the GreenLight Fund helps transform the lives of children, youth and families in high-poverty urban areas by creating local infrastructure and a consistent annual process to: identify critical needs; incubate innovative, entrepreneurial programs that can have a significant, measurable impact, and; galvanize local support to help programs reach and sustain impact in the new city…

To ensure successful launch and leadership, the GreenLight Fund is currently seeking a dynamic, passionate, and collaborative Executive Director to lead the launch and establishment of GreenLight Kansas City. Reporting to the GreenLight Fund National Executive Director and Co-Founder, this entrepreneurial leader will build the GreenLight Kansas City Selection Advisory Council, run the diligence and selection process to identify organizations, support expanding organizations as they launch and grow in Kansas City…”   See it here.

 

National Association of Area Agencies on Aging seeks Chief Executive Officer.  “The CEO is the leader of the agency and is expected to be a model of a servant leader. Reporting to the Board, the CEO provides leadership for the organization and the agency’s management team. The CEO is accountable for carrying out the objectives of the strategic plan, assure compliance with all grants, understand the financial status of the agency, ensure goals are accomplished, engage with human resource matters, and guide the application of all policies and procedures. The CEO is charged with being the voice of the agency – as well as being a voice for Missouri’s Area Agency on Aging network - and is expected to represent the agency in a professional manner with all forms of media… Oversees the agency’s $9M financial operations including the management of the agency’s director of finance, payroll, budgeting, and financial policies. Ensures compliance with regulations regarding human resources, privacy, accounting, lobbying, advocacy, fundraising, and licensing; Stays current on pending or existing legislation that may impact the agency and conveys relevant information to the Board of Directors and other key stakeholders as necessary and appropriate. Advocates for seniors and their families in our service area and across the state of Missouri. Coordinates all activities with legislative issues, which include writing or discussing the issues with the Board of Directors, caregivers and/or participants, members of the legislature and media….”  See it here.

 

$5K+ Contributions

Relax PAC - $25,000 from Get Right Management Company.

Raise Up Missouri - $500,000 from Sixteen Thirty Fund.

New Approach Missouri - $10,000 from Belleau Farms/Adolphus Busch IV

Majority Forward - $10,000 from Friends for Gina Walsh.

 

New Committees

Matthew Simmons formed a candidate committee (Simmons For Missouri) to run for House 33 as a Democrat.

Robert Smith formed a candidate committee (Vote Robert L Smith) to run for House 152 as a Democrat.

Bill Kraemer formed a candidate committee (Bill Kraemer For State Rep) to run for House 116 as a Democrat.

Sierra Club Missouri Political Committee was formed.  Its treasurer is Ross Hunt.  Its deputy treasurer is John Hickey.

 

Birthdays

Happy birthday to Wally Siewert.

To PQ or Not PQ?

As we head into the final week of session, a fair amount of media attention will obviously be on the courthouse in St. Louis where the governor’s trial is happening.

Inside the building these are long and frantic days.  Legislators are trying to get their bills across the finish line. There will be many conference committees to hammer out compromises between conflicting House and Senate versions of legislation.

On the one hand, it’s nuts to not have the governor in the building at this critical time.  On the other hand, he’s not been especially engaged anyway – so maybe it’s no big difference.  Perhaps his staff and department heads will do just fine communicating their preferences about specific language and policy positions.

In the legislation highway, the Senate is where bottlenecks occur.  Every hour of Senate floor time becomes is precious.  When the Senate convenes today at 2PM, you’ll probably see a few senators stand for the first half-hour or so and speak about whatever’s on their mind.  It’s an implicit threat.  It says I can burn precious time without hardly trying.

And then there’s the matter of “PQ” – calling the previous question to stop debate and vote immediately on a bill.

In the Senate the PQ is parliamentary procedure in which the majority asserts its right to pass what it deems necessary.  It has been called a “traumatic” event in the past.  Those whose voices are quieted always respond by throwing sand in the gears of the Senate and slowing the pace down to a snail’s crawl.  The approval of the Journal becomes an hours-long event, for example.

The consensus in the halls is that the Senate will be using the PQ at some point later this week.  Maybe to put the “Freedom to Work” issue on the ballot.  Some think we could see a couple PQs in a row.

I’ve been of the contrary opinion, believing that we wouldn’t see a PQ.  My thinking was that Senate leaders Ron Richard and Mike Kehoe would want to preserve a bipartisan atmosphere ahead of their possible involvement in the impeachment proceedings.  Furthermore, Richard has spoken more and more this session about the institution of the Senate.  I’ve been imagining that he sees leaving the institution in a functioning state would be a more important “legacy” than any particular piece of legislation. Plus, they’ve already passed a heck of a lot of meaningful packages this session.

I am, however, in the minority opinion on this.  The consensus us that we’ll see PQ(s?) this week.

 

Post on Greitens Scandal

Washington Post had an article on how Greitens’ affair fits into the MeToo movement.  See it here.

Pull Quote:  If Missouri’s governor, Eric Greitens, is convicted or impeached in the coming weeks, as many in the state now expect, he will join a growing roster of politicians and celebrities in driving home a powerful new lesson: The shape of the American sex scandal has shifted. Adultery itself may no longer end a career, but if you use coercion or violence against women, you’re as good as done… As his trial gets underway Monday, Greitens also faces an impeachment vote when a special session begins Friday in the Missouri House of Representatives, where the fact that his own party enjoys a large majority may be no saving grace.

“There’s been a shift,” said Missouri state Rep. Jean Evans, a Republican, “and people are more willing to speak publicly to condemn violence against women, even if it’s from your own party.”…

Trump won Missouri with 57 percent of the vote in 2016, and his supporters break into two camps as they consider their governor’s predicament, Republican strategists say: Hardcore Trump devotees often express skepticism about the allegations against Greitens, picking up on the president’s habit of characterizing talk of scandalous behavior as “fake news.” And those who voted for Trump more hesitantly — mostly as a protest against a paralyzed, unresponsive political system — see Greitens’s case as one more example of cultural decline, corruption and moral rot.

“There’s a good 35 percent of the Republican base who believe the allegations against Greitens are a witch hunt or ‘just an affair,’ ” said James Harris, a veteran GOP political consultant in Jefferson City, Mo. “The governor’s defenders have done a very good job of using messaging very similar to the president’s to characterize this as a liberal prosecutor’s witch hunt. But, of course, there’s never been an allegation that the president hit or duct-taped a woman.”…

The political impact of the Greitens scandal weighs heavily on many Missouri Republicans. “This is going to drive suburban women to turn out and vote for [Sen.] Claire McCaskill and other Democrats,” Harris said. “As long as the governor remains in office, it allows the impression that Republicans are okay with this behavior.”

 

MOScout Poll

The Weekly MOScout poll (see it here) showed US Senator Claire McCaskill again with a lead over Attorney General Josh Hawley.  It also showed President Donald Trump maintaining a 50% job approval rating.  And Governor Eric Greitens still underwater on his job approval.

And

Remember this is with the Remington Research weightings which anticipate a +9 Republican environment this November.

eMailbag on Poll

I have never seen a R dip below 33%. I feel like that 33% represents the people that

just flat hate democrats and an R could probably murder someone and they would still

pick the R over the D.

 

Richard on Jurists Selection

Senate Pro Tem Ron Richard, speaking to reporters at last week’s press avail, indicated that he had done some thinking about the Senate’s duty to choose jurists in the impeachment process – if it comes to that.

Richard said that – despite suggestions from some observers – the Senate position is that retired judges are not eligible to serve in this capacity.

He also said that they planned to avoid choosing judges who would be “up for retention,” in other words, folks who would be on the ballot themselves this year.

And, he said that the Senate would aim to have a good “mix” among the seven jurists, in terms of their geographical representation of the state.

 

Help Wanted

GreenLight Fund seeks Executive Director.  “Founded in Boston in 2003, the GreenLight Fund helps transform the lives of children, youth and families in high-poverty urban areas by creating local infrastructure and a consistent annual process to: identify critical needs; incubate innovative, entrepreneurial programs that can have a significant, measurable impact, and; galvanize local support to help programs reach and sustain impact in the new city…

To ensure successful launch and leadership, the GreenLight Fund is currently seeking a dynamic, passionate, and collaborative Executive Director to lead the launch and establishment of GreenLight Kansas City. Reporting to the GreenLight Fund National Executive Director and Co-Founder, this entrepreneurial leader will build the GreenLight Kansas City Selection Advisory Council, run the diligence and selection process to identify organizations, support expanding organizations as they launch and grow in Kansas City…”   See it here.

 

National Association of Area Agencies on Aging seeks Chief Executive Officer.  “The CEO is the leader of the agency and is expected to be a model of a servant leader. Reporting to the Board, the CEO provides leadership for the organization and the agency’s management team. The CEO is accountable for carrying out the objectives of the strategic plan, assure compliance with all grants, understand the financial status of the agency, ensure goals are accomplished, engage with human resource matters, and guide the application of all policies and procedures. The CEO is charged with being the voice of the agency – as well as being a voice for Missouri’s Area Agency on Aging network - and is expected to represent the agency in a professional manner with all forms of media… Oversees the agency’s $9M financial operations including the management of the agency’s director of finance, payroll, budgeting, and financial policies. Ensures compliance with regulations regarding human resources, privacy, accounting, lobbying, advocacy, fundraising, and licensing; Stays current on pending or existing legislation that may impact the agency and conveys relevant information to the Board of Directors and other key stakeholders as necessary and appropriate. Advocates for seniors and their families in our service area and across the state of Missouri. Coordinates all activities with legislative issues, which include writing or discussing the issues with the Board of Directors, caregivers and/or participants, members of the legislature and media….”  See it here.

 

$5K+ Contributions

Relax PAC - $25,000 from Get Right Management Company.

Raise Up Missouri - $500,000 from Sixteen Thirty Fund.

New Approach Missouri - $10,000 from Belleau Farms/Adolphus Busch IV

Majority Forward - $10,000 from Friends for Gina Walsh.

 

New Committees

Matthew Simmons formed a candidate committee (Simmons For Missouri) to run for House 33 as a Democrat.

Robert Smith formed a candidate committee (Vote Robert L Smith) to run for House 152 as a Democrat.

Bill Kraemer formed a candidate committee (Bill Kraemer For State Rep) to run for House 116 as a Democrat.

Sierra Club Missouri Political Committee was formed.  Its treasurer is Ross Hunt.  Its deputy treasurer is John Hickey.

 

Birthdays

Happy birthday to Wally Siewert.